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Rabbi Joel

Male 1730 - 1811  (81 years)


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  • Name Joel  
    Prefix Rabbi 
    Born 1730 
    Gender Male 
    Biography He was taken to Berlin, Germany as a twelve-year-old boy, where charitable fellow Jews accepted him and undertook for his Talmudic studies. After some years he went to Frankfurt-on-Main where he stayed for nine years, studying eagerly with Rabbi Gerschon son of Jechiel until his marriage.

    Probably a Polish merchant took him home from the trade fair for his daughter, that is to his family town of Mesericz where, in the meantime, better times had come. Here Gitel, the daughter of the rich R. Juda, became his wife, and the couple settled down in the house of her parents along with the children who were born to them there. They were financially supported so that he was able to continue studying Torah undisturbed.

    However, after the death of his father-in-law, the latter’s fortune was used up, and R. Joel felt compelled to return to Berlin, Germany, where he had friends, while leaving his family behind in Mesericz. There, however, his wife and children languished, remaining without upbringing and instruction. R. Joel, who supported himself in Berlin, Germany for seven years by giving instruction, finally got on his feet to let his family come.

    The then Rabbi R. Hirsch bestowed upon him authorization as a rabbi and got him the position in Schönlanke, even though it was without a salary, but the subsidy of friends in Berlin, Germany as well as the generosity of his community itself enabled him to get by. His confirmation as a rabbi in Schönlanke took place at the expenditure of his friends in Berlin, Germany. The relevant cabinet order is found in the regional archives in Posen and contains the following:

    Schönlanke Protocol 9th March 1779

    In this protocol local Jewish elders, Samuel Leiser and Jacob Samuel were questioned as to whether they were willing to accept the Jew Joel Meyer from Pommersch Stargardt as their rabbi.

    The aforementioned elders in the name of the entire community herewith declare that it should be taken as truth that they have chosen and accepted Joel Meyer as their rabbi and have stipulated for him the following conditions.

    1) He alone is to bear all the costs of his position, also rectify those costs which the master of the property at the present state government for the possible conseus is justified to demand because he had to receive something for the permit at the time of the Poles.
    2) He must be satisfied with weekly pay of 1 rt. 8 gr., and, in addition to this, benefits to which a rabbi is entitled. If he is satisfied with these conditions then they wanted in the name of the entire community to request his confirmation.

    Signature
    Samuel Leiser)
    Jacob Samuel) in Hebrew script

    Further:

    By the grace of God, Friedrich King of Prussia, Marggraf of Brandenburg, of the Holy Roman Empire, Arch Treasurer and Elector in full authority

    First, our kind salutations! Most erudite councilors, dear loyal supporters!
    Since according to your most deferential report of the 15th of the present month, there are no reservations concerning the appointment of a rabbi in Schönlancke, and the Jews there have unanimously chosen Joel Meyer, the son of the late guardian-Jew of Stargardt, Meyer Joseph, following an interview by the local uplands elder, Jacob Moses, and assertion of 19th January, for which the latter in any event must take responsibility. Therefore, in this respect, the choice of Joel Meyer as the rabbi by the Schönlancke Jews is herewith most graciously confirmed and you have to decree, on your part, whatever is further necessary. May you be blessed. Given in Berlin, Germany, 24th March 1779.

    At the special order of the same most gracious Imperial Majesty.
    Two illegible signatures.

    To the West Prussian Chamber delegation at Bromberg, concerning the confirmation of Joel Meyer, the son of the late guardian-Jew of Stargardt, Meyer Joseph, as the choice of the Jewish community in Schönlancke as their rabbi.

    After R. Joel had served in Schönlanke for nine years, he had his work יתדות אהלים (“Tent Pegs”) published. At that time he had 5 children whom he diligently brought up and instructed himself, in order to make up for the neglect of Mesericz.

    Probably a Polish merchant took him home from the trade fair for his daughter, that is to his family town of Mesericz where, in the meantime,
    better times had come. Here Gitel, the daughter of the rich R. Juda, became his wife, and the couple settled down in the house of her parents along with the children who were born to them there. They were financially supported so that he was able to continue studying Torah undisturbed. However, after the death of his father-in-law, the latter’s fortune was used up, and R. Joel felt compelled to return to Berlin, Germany, where he had friends, while leaving his family behind in Mesericz. There, however, his wife and children languished, remaining without upbringing and instruction. R. Joel, who supported himself in Berlin, Germany for seven years by giving instruction, finally got on his feet to let his family come. The then Rabbi R. Hirsch bestowed upon him authorization as a rabbi and got him the position in Schönlanke, even though it was without a salary, but the subsidy of friends in Berlin, Germany as well as the generosity of his community itself enabled him to get by. His confirmation as a rabbi in Schönlanke took place at the expenditure of his friends in Berlin, Germany. The relevant cabinet order is found in the regional archives in Posen and contains the following:

    Schönlanke Protocol 9th March 1779

    In this protocol local Jewish elders, Samuel Leiser and Jacob Samuel were questioned as to whether they were willing to accept the Jew Joel Meyer from Pommersch Stargardt as their rabbi.

    The aforementioned elders in the name of the entire community herewith declare that it should be taken as truth that they have chosen and accepted Joel Meyer as their rabbi and have stipulated for him the following conditions.

    1) He alone is to bear all the costs of his position, also rectify those costs which the master of the property at the present state government for the possible conseus is justified to demand because he had to receive something for the permit at the time of the Poles.
    2) He must be satisfied with weekly pay of 1 rt. 8 gr., and, in addition to this, benefits to which a rabbi is entitled. If he is satisfied with these conditions then they wanted in the name of the entire community to request his confirmation.

    Signature
    Samuel Leiser)
    Jacob Samuel) in Hebrew script

    Further:

    By the grace of God, Friedrich King of Prussia, Marggraf of Brandenburg, of the Holy Roman Empire, Arch Treasurer and Elector in full authority

    First, our kind salutations! Most erudite councilors, dear loyal supporters!
    Since according to your most deferential report of the 15th of the present month, there are no reservations concerning the appointment of a rabbi in Schönlancke, and the Jews there have unanimously chosen Joel Meyer, the son of the late guardian-Jew of Stargardt, Meyer Joseph, following an interview by the local uplands elder, Jacob Moses, and assertion of 19th January, for which the latter in any event must take responsibility. Therefore, in this respect, the choice of Joel Meyer as the rabbi by the Schönlancke Jews is herewith most graciously confirmed and you have to decree, on your part, whatever is further necessary. May you be blessed. Given in Berlin, Germany, 24th March 1779.

    At the special order of the same most gracious Imperial Majesty.
    Two illegible signatures.

    To the West Prussian Chamber delegation at Bromberg, concerning the confirmation of Joel Meyer, the son of the late guardian-Jew of Stargardt, Meyer Joseph, as the choice of the Jewish community in Schönlancke as their rabbi.

    After R. Joel had served in Schönlanke for nine years, he had his work יתדות אהלים (“Tent Pegs”) published. At that time he had 5 children whom he diligently brought up and instructed himself, in order to make up for the neglect of Mesericz.

    R. Joel carefully wrote down his homilies that he gave on Shabbat Tshuva and the Shabbat before Pesach, as well as many things which he had lectured on as he had opportunity. Another part precedes this collection, which begins in the year 1788 and continues until the year of his death in 1811 under the title of יריעות אהלים )“Tent Coverings”(, which appeared in printed form in Berlin, Germany in 1788; it contains the sermons on the weekly Torah portions. At the end, the author names some friends and relations who help him with the printing costs.

    First of all he mentions a benefactor, who does not want to be expressly named, but is hinted at in the title of the work, however, he clearly mentions the name of his son, the fellow contributors, that is R. Abraham for Stargard, the son of R. Jacob Zewi from Berlin, Germany, where he was renowned as a landlord. In addition, his cousin Koppel Cohn, the son of his uncle Hirsch Cohn from Stargard (who has already been described in more detail above) and finally Ruben the son of Mosche son of Getzel, the last Dayan in Posen (already mentioned earlier) the same (Ruben) with his sons Getzel, son-in-law of Rabbi Joseph in Czarikau, and Natan.

    I have intentionally related these final remarks of the author in detail because they prove the transplanting of the Asch Family to Arnswalde, where the family names Asch, Fliess and Riess develop among the descendents. R. Joseph, mentioned lastly, later came to Stargard where he remained in people’s memories as the district rabbi.

    What R. Joel hoped to achieve with his book, that is to gain the means of improving his miserable circumstances by the profits from the sales of the latter did not happen. He trusted his rhetorical powers to obtain a dowry for his daughter, Rosa, through his lectures in different places. Therefore, he traveled extensively, as far as Copenhagen and to Germany. He was also considerably successful, then the sad news reached him in Frankfurt-on-Main of the death of his daughter, Rosa. Later (1803) he married off his daughter Chaye Sara to *** Leib *** from Gollanz.

    These announcements along with others concerning the family are to be found especially in the 2nd part of the Collection of Homilies. Once he laments in melancholy fashion: born into poverty, being obligated to study Torah, suffering hardship and want, I was given a wife with a fortune in Mesericz, so that I could devote myself undisturbed to study – there misfortune entered in, the fortune was lost after the death of my parents-in-law. I went to my friends in Berlin, Germany, where I gave instruction, until I came to Schönlanke as a rabbi, without a salary and specific income. But I was able to teach my children and train them all to be learned in Torah – this is my entire fortune, my great happiness.

    In his lectures during times of war (up to 1810) he raised his admonishing voice for repentance, at the same time, however, his consoling references to the approaching coming of the Messiah – in the night of Pesach each year, for which he always knew how to find a suitable bible text (Gematria or Remez). Especially he hoped in 1810, when he chose the significant word taka (that is the great trumpet). With enthusiasm he turns one time on the Shabbat before Pesach to his listeners with the words: I demand that you keep awake as to your salvation, both men and women, young and old, stay alert at the Seder table and listen to the contents of the Haggada in German. Perhaps the great trumpet will sound then all of a sudden to our freedom or Elijah appears as herald – and if it does not happen this year, we continue to hope that it will surely be fulfilled.

    In the writings of the family the name Asch is exchanged for Afar Family
    or also with the addition of ‘from the stock of *** Shlomo.  [1
    Hebrew Death 5 Tis 5572 
    Occupation Rabbi 
    Residence Mesericz, Poland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence Berlin, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence Schonlanke, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 23 Sep 1811  Schonlanke, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3697  Blank Family
    Last Modified 18 Feb 2010 

    Father Meier Ben Joseph,   b. 1690, Mesericz, Poland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1750  (Age 60 years) 
    Mother Esther Cohn,   b. Yes - date unknown, Stargard, Pomerania, Prussia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes - date unknown 
    Married Abt 1725 
    Family ID F1355  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Gitel,   b. 1730, Mesericz, Poland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jan 1798  (Age 68 years) 
    Married Abt 1760  Mesericz, Poland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Rosa,   b. Abt 1770,   d. 1800  (Age ~ 30 years)
     2. Ya’akov Koppel,   b. 1774, Hannover, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1853  (Age 79 years)
     3. Rabbi Yehuda Asch,   b. Abt 1776,   d. 4 Feb 1831  (Age ~ 55 years)
     4. Rabbi Shmuel,   b. Yes - date unknown,   d. Yes - date unknown
     5. Rabbi Meir,   b. Yes - date unknown,   d. Yes - date unknown
     6. Chaya Sara,   b. Yes - date unknown,   d. Yes - date unknown
    Last Modified 12 Jun 2007 
    Family ID F1357  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Abt 1760 - Mesericz, Poland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - - Mesericz, Poland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - - Berlin, Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - - Schonlanke, Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 23 Sep 1811 - Schonlanke, Germany Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Headstones
    Headstone of Joel Asch
    Headstone of Joel Asch

    Histories
    The Asch Family Tree Translated by Eva Ruth Knoller
    The Asch Family Tree Translated by Eva Ruth Knoller

  • Sources 
    1. [S186] The Asch Family Tree, Professor Dr. A. Berliner.


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